Capitalism's characteristic emphasis on freedom of trade and market expansion has encouraged social mobility, global exploration and intellectual curiosity. Wherever and whenever it has appeared across the world's continents capitalism has undermined monopolies, economic protectionism and restrictive practices. Individuals, companies and nations have been enriched materially as a result of the choices and opportunities extended to them by the capitalist dynamo and its liberation of the human spirit has dismantled antiquated ways of thinking as well as outmoded social hierarchies.
Capitalism is the single most important force in the making of the modern world and its impact knows no boundaries. In the wake of the banking collapse of 2008, capitalism has had to surmount a profound economic crisis while also confronting severe attacks on its code of ethics. In studying capitalism's contemporary history, this course investigated the means by which it survived as well as its continuing legitimacy as a moral system.

PUBLICATIONS

April 2015

An Introduction to the History of Capitalism, 600-1900 AD - Vol. I

A collection of essays by Benedikt Koehler, David Abulafia, Victoria Bateman, Huw Bowen and Nicholas Crafts

Introduction by Hywel Williams

Published by the Legatum Institute

January 2016

A World Transformed: Studies in the History of Capitalism - Vol. II

A collection of essays by Philip Kay, David Abulafia, Maarten Prak, Deirdre McCloskey, Bronwen Everill, Philipp Blom, Stephen Clarke and Andrew Roberts

Introduction by Hywel Williams

Published by the Legatum Institute